Quotidian Hopes: Interfaith in Auckland as a Movement for ‘Good’, by Sarah Haggar

In this short piece, Kākano Award winner Sarah Haggar reflects on a memorable fieldwork moment from her MA research, Quotidian Hopes: Interfaith in Auckland as a Movement for ‘Good’.

Call for proposals for new Routledge book series: Anthropology and Cultural History in Asia and the Indo-Pacific

Pamela Stewart and Andrew Strathern are calling for book proposals for their new Routledge series, Anthropology and Cultural History in Asia and the Indo-Pacific. 

Shifting States 2017 Conference Funding available

Through a generous award from the Wenner-Gren Foundation, as well as funds from the ASA, AAS and ASAA/NZ, we have funds available to support delegates attending the 2017  Shifting States conference in Adelaide. 

The Call for Funding applications is open until 11 September 2017. See the funding page for eligibility and criteria.

Please visit the conference website for more information about the conference theme, keynote presentations, events and panels, and for practical information about Adelaide.

 

Public lecture: A reflection on Parihaka and resolution of Māori-Crown grievances in the settlement era

Vaughan Park and Massey University are pleased to invite you to this free public lecture, to be held on 9 August 2017 at Massey University's Albany Campus. Judge Sarah Reeves and Puna Wano-Bryant will speak on the topic, 'Restoration, Redress, Reconciliation: A reflection on Parihaka and resolution of Māori-Crown grievances in the settlement era.'

Pacific Interest Group of the American Anthropological Association

Do you work in/on issues relating to Oceania? Are you planning to attend the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association? If so, you could consider joining the AAA's Pacific Interest Group (formerly Melanesia Interest Group).

Successful celebration of 50 years of anthropology at Victoria University of Wellington

VUW's Eli Elinoff shares a brief summary of last week's events.

Last week the Cultural Anthropology programme at Victoria University of Wellington celebrated its 50th Anniversary. In honour of the milestone, we organized an event highlighting the history of anthropology at Victoria, exploring the changing face of the discipline in New Zealand, and speculating about the futures of anthropological knowledge.

The celebration began on May 10th with a Pōwhiri and Marae Kōrero at the meetinghouse on Te Tumu Herenga Waka Marae on VUW's Kelburn campus. We discussed the origins of the cultural anthropology programme with two of its founding members, Dame Dr. Joan Metge and Bernie Kernot.

Dame Dr. Joan Metge (standing) during the marae kōrero at Te Tumu Herenga Waka. Bernie Kernott is seated to the left, and Te Range Hīroa is to the far left.

Dame Dr. Joan Metge (standing) during the marae kōrero at Te Tumu Herenga Waka. Bernie Kernott is seated to the left, and Te Range Hīroa is to the far left.

May 11th began with a keynote address by Dr. Michael Jackson, programme alumni and Distinguished Professor of World Religions at Harvard University. Next, we had two panel discussions from anthropologists across New Zealand. Finally, Professor Dame Anne Salmond from the University of Auckland delivered a second public keynote.

On May 12th, the events concluded with a morning symposium featuring the work of current post-graduates and programme alumni.