These young Burmese children, after tiring of being in formal dress for a village wedding, quickly retired to the bride's home to play Angry Birds | Photo by Keziah Wallis, March 2015

ASAA/NZ News

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ASAA/NZ Blog Moderation Policy

Here at ASAA/NZ we wish for the comments threads on our blog to encourage free flowing, thought provoking and stimulating discussions. While it is okay to disagree with other viewpoints we request that you remain open minded and respectful. You do not have to agree with everything you read here; indeed, divergent opinions and constructive criticism are welcome. However, this is not a forum to express messages of hate or to promote personal agendas. Instead we want foster discussions that expand on or illuminate key messages within the blog posts.

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ASAA/NZ e-list

ASAA/NZ runs an e-list for discussion about all things related to anthropology within and beyond Aotearoa/New Zealand, including current events, job listings, conferences, recent publications, research questions, requests for information, and so on. The Executive Committee frequently uses the e-list to discuss issues with ASAA/NZ members and communicate its activities and decisions. The e-list is primarily for ASAA/NZ members but others interested in anthropology are welcome to join and contribute.

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'Taking the Babies to Graze' Every day, after the men have eaten the first of their two meals of rice and lentils, or ‘dal bhat’, the elephants of the Khorsor stable are ridden into the Royal Chitwan National Park in Nepal for 5 hours of grazing. The baby elephants accompany their mothers by natural inclination and will not require their own drivers until they are separated from their mothers and subjected to training | Photo by Piers Locke

'Taking the Babies to Graze'
Every day, after the men have eaten the first of their two meals of rice and lentils, or ‘dal bhat’, the elephants of the Khorsor stable are ridden into the Royal Chitwan National Park in Nepal for 5 hours of grazing. The baby elephants accompany their mothers by natural inclination and will not require their own drivers until they are separated from their mothers and subjected to training | Photo by Piers Locke


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